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  • Golden Leaf Trees

    Golden leaves look like autumn trees on a grassy hill.

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    I wanted to try something new. Being stuck creatively because of the VOG filled sky left me to play with macro compositions.

    I had been walking by golden leaves that had fallen on the stained concrete for a few months now. I always thought leaves look like small trees and wanted to play with this idea. With the moss ground covering along the edges of the concrete pathway I lined some leaves along it to play with a tree on a hill concept. I took two different focal shots and stacked them in Photoshop for sharpness and then began working on darkening the background for depth.

    It was a lot of fun trying to create a concept photograph. This exercise opened up my mind to a new way of photographing nature.

    © Christopher Johnson

  • BigNakedWall.com

    I am excited to be apart of the amazing BigNakedWall.com back lit framing system. Their seamless non-corrosive aluminum framing and LED backlit lighting will transform any wall into an amazing focal point. Not to mention the artwork is interchangeable in order to keep your space feeling fresh and new. For more information on the framing system you can check out their website … www.bignakedwall.com

    Most of my work is available for printing on this back lit medium. Please contact me for more information via my contact page.

    Pricing begins at $1,800 for a 20×30 frame and print… or $325 for a 20×30 print only.

    With a flip of a switch your walls can glow with beautiful artwork that is not only elegant, but mesmerizing.

     

     

  • Kauai Drive Guide

    Kauai Drive Guide Vacation Planner cover shot

     

    Excited to find my photograph of a beautiful orange Hibiscus flower was purchased for the cover of the Kauai Drive Guide for the months of April – July, 2017.

  • Technical Difficulties

    Contact Form was broken, but is now fixed.

    I have been under the impression that my contact form was working. I just found out that it wasn’t and I don’t know for how long. If you have been trying to reach out to me I apologize that I haven’t responded.

    It is now up and running just fine.

  • Through Movement

    Design of the jagged patterns of the rocky Hawaiian shoreline

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    Exploring along the coastline in search for some hidden creative possibilities I found this jagged opening. I sat and watched how the cerulean blue water navigated through the large dark cracked opening. Pushing and swirling against the edges until finding a dead end, crashing, splashing, spraying violently, and finally washing backward through the jagged rocks back into the ocean.

    © Christopher Johnson

    Purchase a print by visiting my RedBubble page.

  • Island Naturals Art Display

    Photography For February 2017

     

    For the month of February 2017, I will be displaying my photography in the dining area of the Island Naturals natural food store in Kailua Kona, Hawaii. If you are in the area please come by and check it out.


    If you are at my site because you saw my artwork and wanted to view more I would like to say THANK YOU … it means a lot to me.

    The images on display are for sale along with those on this site. I have a growing storefront on RedBubble where prints, mugs, phone cases, and more can be purchased. If you are looking for an image that isn’t available please contact me using the Contact Page or by my phone number on my flyer or business card.

     

    30″x40″ – Chameleon – “This Isn’t Working” – $580.00

    30″x40″ – Sunset – “Keahole Sunset” – $580.00

    30″x40″ – Purple Flower – “Macro” – $580.00

    16″x48″ – Paddle Board Sunset – “Relax” – $390.00

     

     

  • Kamokuna At Night

    Photographing the Kamokuna Lava Ocean Entry at Night

     

    On December 31st there was a drastic change to the shoreline at the Kamokuna ocean entry. The lower shelf that the lava once gradually flowed over before entering into the ocean as well as part of an old lookout point fell into the ocean. Somewhere around 17 acres of land suddenly disappeared. I had to go see it and so as a last minute plan we headed over. I couldn’t believe the amount of roadblocks we encountered on the way. Dead car battery, flat bike tires, missing headlamps, and an accident that closed the road for 30min. While sitting in traffic I turned to my wife and said. “I don’t think we’re gonna make it in time.” At that point we considered abandoning the mission, but to our surprise the road opened up and we were on our way. Lucky it did because I don’t know when we would be able to get back over there.

    The trail was light with people, so we were able to ride with ease without having to worry about everyone and made it with plenty of daylight to spare. When we came prior to the collapse, in August of 2016, the road went on further and we were able to get close to the lava. Close enough where we were able to see a lot of action with our naked eyes. Now the new lookout puts us several hundreds of yards away. The action is harder to see without binoculars or zoom lenses. With the amount of smoke billowing off of the entry even seeing the lava is difficult. A gust of wind would swoop in and push the smoke where we would get a glimpse of the large lava river draining into the ocean. It was impressive to see even with the great distance.

    My family walked around and explored all the viewing areas while I found a spot I liked and didn’t move from that spot the entire time we were there. With the small crowds of people I wanted to make sure that I had a front row spot where I didn’t need to worry about someone moving in front of me. Even still I had the occasional tourist think I was their husband and stand next to me while telling me about how they nearly fell down in the dark. I would slowly look up and watch them get flustered with embarrassment and walk away. Strangely enough it happened more than once.

    My lens of choice was the 300mm telephoto for the distance. It was windy, so I needed to weigh the tripod down with my bag and crank down all the setting nobs. I also used a cable release and waited for the wind to die down before taking the shots in order to reduce camera shake. Any slight movement while fully zoomed in will move the composition a couple feet.

    It was at night that the lava glowed and showed life with a lot of small explosions. I decided to capture the night sky with my wide angle before leaving. I took 8 to 10 – 30 second shots while my kids grew impatient. They were definitely ready to start the long bike ride back and get something to eat.

    As I stepped off my bike at the car I was relieved the bike ride was over. Any longer and the extra hard, value engineered, cheap ass seat would have to be surgically removed from me. It has been a couple weeks since then, but I swear I walk differently now. We had fun.

    © Christopher Johnson

     

    View more lava images – http://www.fromhereonin.com/volcanic-activity/

  • Halemaumau Crater

    Photo of the lava churning and spattering in the Halemaumau crater

     

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    Having heard the lava was very active due to a piece of the crater wall collapsing into the lava lake, I was extremely excited to visit the Jaggar museum that night. I headed out after work with my family and arrived at the Volcano hours later with the unfortunate drizzle of rain. I wasn’t expecting much, in fact I wasn’t expecting I was going to see anything due to heavy fog or rain clouds. On a previous trip I knew we were getting close because the sky had an amazing bright orange glow, however, this trip wasn’t as apparent. My hopes were fading.

    We arrived at the Jaggar museum lookout along with many others. Gathering up our gear took a while, but eventually we set out to the view point. With the glow of the lava and the orange night step lights leading our way to the lookout, we were all amazed at the amazing sight of the active lava lake. Never before have I been able to see the lava lake from the Jaggar museum. Usually just a glow of light as smoke billowed away. There were cracks of bright yellow and orange moving around. Forming new connections with other cracks while closing others. The most mystical sight was the sputtering lava against the crater wall.

    Photographing the lava was difficult. I needed a higher iso in order to stop the motion of the lava, but not too high as to pixelate the image beyond usability. In order to capture the lava up close I needed the full range of my telephoto lens at 300mm. This all doesn’t seem difficult, but adding wind and rain to the equation made this difficult. Any small movement of the lens would move the image drastically, which generated a blurry image. I had to wait for relief in the wind, but then the rain would speckle the lens. It was a little bit of a dance to get the shots.

    For the image above I shot two focal ranges. The trees were several feet in front of me, while the lava was hundreds of feet away. Maybe thousands. It took a lot of blending and luminosity masks in Photoshop to merge the images to one.

    Aloha!

    © Christopher Johnson

     

    Purchase this piece by visiting my RedBubble page.

  • Kilauea From Above

    Celebrating our 16th anniversary, my wife and I went on an amazing helicopter tour around the Big Island with Blue Hawaiian. We began towards the volcano, then made our way north along the Hamakua coastline to the amazing valleys north of Waipio. This is one of the coolest, most breathtaking Hawaiian adventures I have ever taken. I strongly recommend going.

    This post is mainly to show images of the smoke that is coming out of the volcano. I will be showing the valleys in a later post.

    Enjoy!

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Mauna Kea

    Venturing up Mauna Kea with the family to watch the Perseid meteor shower. We stayed up at the visitors center where we were told the meteors would be visible around 1 am and really visible just after the moon went down, sometime after 2 am. Unfortunately we didn’t make it to the moon set. The fog came rolling in and out through out the night, but came in to stay around 1 am. Instead I drove home as the family slept.

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Volcanic Activity

    A photography trip to the Kamomuna lava flow and Halemaumau Crater

     

    A last minute decision to see the lava flow from the Kalapana side made a lot of amazing memories. My wife an I were amazed to see the island expanding right before our eyes and inches from our feet.

    A 4.5 mile trip, I would recommend riding a bike, will get you to the flow that covered the gravel emergency access road. Where you park there are a lot of people renting bikes, selling food, water, and artwork.  Bring as much water as you can pack. They park service recommends 1 gallon for each person.  This is not a leisure activity. The trek is long and hot.

    It took us about 45 minutes to make the bike ride to the lava flow at a mild pace. The sun was setting as we arrived and we decided to venture up the hills of lava to see the lava flowing over the earth. Immediately I was in total amazement as I witnessed the lava slowly pouring down the hillside amongst a crowd of people. It was amazing to feel how hot the lava was. Like opening an oven door. I stepped up close to get a few close shots, but had to step back quickly to cool down.

    After about 20min we retreated down to the ocean entry where the cliffside was outlined with spectators. Watching the waves battle against the hot molten lava. The energy explodes and lets off smoke and steam which is highlighted by a red glow as it blows over the landscape. We sat until we ached from sitting on the hard ground and then decided to venture back up to the lava flow again.

    The masses of people continued to populate the area, so we decided to leave and check out the Volcano National Park.

    It was an amazing adventure that hooked me on volcanic photography.

    © Christopher Johnson

     

    Check out my new image of the Halemaumau Crater – http://www.fromhereonin.com/halemaumau-crater

  • Peaberry & Galette

    I displaying artwork from June 10th to August 1st, 2016 at the Peaberry & Galette Cafe in the Keauhou shopping center located next to the Theatre.

     

    Artwork is for sale.

    The 30X40 framed Chameleon, Sea Arch, and Purple Flower canvas prints are available for $380 each.

    The 16X48 framed Wave canvas print is available for $200.

  • Marble

    This macro image of a marble, backlit with a table lamp, looks like a planet in our solar system.

    I bought some marbles this weekend to experiment with exposure and composition. The shot I had in mind hasn’t been realized yet, but by accident I came up with this planet looking shot.

    © Christopher Johnson

     

  • Two Fifteen

    I visited this location two days in a row when the sunset had some promise. The first day was disappointing when the sun popped under the clouds as a dull glowing ball surrounded by the colorless grey haze, blocking any chance of color and light. I was successful when I shot while the sun was high, but during the finale the absence of light pushed my shutter speed too slow. While I wan’t going to compromise any more on aperture and ISO I packed up. However, the next day I was graced with the appearance of the sun. Again I watched as the sun faded behind the low lying haze that trapped the sunlight from under lighting the belly of the clouds, but I was happy to witness some color on the horizon.
    My goal with this shot, against this sunset, was to capture the color and texture of the seaweed with a 1 second shutter. The surf was high and I didn’t want to risk a tight ground shot, so instead, I framed a glimpse of the foreground.
    Enjoy…
    © Christopher Johnson

  • On Location

    My wife had taken a picture of me while I photographed a large hole in the Keahole Point coastline. For over 3 years I have been visiting this, and many other, blow holes along the coastline, but I never really understood how big they actually were until now. Seeing an image of me standing on the edge with the water completely drained may have me second guess my approach the next time I re-visit any one of the six blow holes I frequent, but I hope not.

    The next image is the shot I took from this location. I think it’s cool to see these images together.

     

    © Christopher Johnson