Floral

  • Yellow Hibiscus

    A beautiful yellow Hibiscus flower found on the Big Island of Hawaii.

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    Picked from one of the Hibiscus bushes we have out in our front yard. I selected this flower because of how the style curved right at the end so that I could photograph the profile of the flower and have all of the 5 stigma balls visual instead of overlapping each other.

    I don’t have much of a studio, so I have to improvise. I was able to float the flower away from its background by pinning it to the bottom of my kitchen cabinets with a safety pin. With natural light I needed a longer than desired shutter speed, so I had to close all windows and stop the fans to keep the flower from wavering. Then with a timer set to 2 seconds on the camera I quickly and carefully pressed the shutter and gently fluttered a white towel in the background to blur any shadow or detail that might be picked up by the camera. The depth of field wasn’t enough to pick up all the details of the flower, so I focus stacked 2 images for the final piece.

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Hibiscus Schizopetalus on Black

    A beautiful red Hibiscus Schizopetalus against a black background.

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    These Hibiscus Schizopetalus, also know as the Coral Hibiscus, and the Japanese Lantern, are my favorite of the Hibiscus family. They have so much character with their long thin stamen dangling far away from their crazy flaring and chaotic petals.

    On a long walk I found a bush of these flowers and picked one to photograph when I returned home. Carefully I carried this flower for a good hour before setting up with a strobe and photographing several different poses of it. I thought for sure it would be wilted when I finally got home, but I was pleasantly surprised it maintained its shape and form.

    Aside from this image against a black background I shot the opposing image with a white background and still can’t decide which I like better.

    © Christopher Johnson

     

  • Purple Drama

    Macro photograph of the beautiful dyed purple and turquoise petals of a Chrysanthemum flower as they curl around each other.

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    © Christopher Johnson

  • Cactus Lines

    A macro photograph of the lines and thorns of a budding blue agave cactus.

    In the center of the agave is a tall spine which is made up of a bunch of newer leaves bundled together. As they mature they begin to fall away from each other, spanning out like wings, until eventually they find the ground to decay. The coolest part of this process is that during the time the leaves are bound together they imprint their spines and designs on to each other which never goes away. How symbolic of life. When we grow up we are imprinted with the people we grow with and that imprint never really goes away. It may fade, but if we look carefully we can see these imprints on others whether good or bad… Hopefully good.

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Palm Frond

    The pattern of an ever-changing palm frond as it blows in the wind.

    I have become fascinated by palm fronds after watching and observing them for a few years from my lanai. The sunlight transforms the leaves on the frond through out the day while accenting differed characteristics of the tropical tree. With this image the light was low and the front leaves were shadowing the back leaves which created a zebra like pattern against the bright sky. As a black and white image the pattern was accented.

    Buy a print on my FineArtAmerica store. There are different sizes and styles to choose from to fit your needs.

    © Christopher Johnson

     

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  • Hibiscus Schizopetalus

    Photograph of a red Hibiscus Schizopetalus against a white background.

    I have always found these Hibiscus flowers fascinating and have been wanting to photograph one for a long time. The way they hang off of a branch with their long stamen delicately hanging and swaying in the wind in contrast to the thrown back, crazy petals makes these Hibiscus super unique.

    While on a walk, about a mile away from home, I picked this flowers off of a bush to photograph. The only thing was the day was hot and I worried that it would wilt before I got home, but it held up. Maybe it was my wife’s care that it survived. If it were in my large hands it would surely not have made it.

    With a magnetic bag clip magnetized to the inner screw of an upper cabinet door I clipped the flower and propped a white pillow behind for a backdrop. I used an off camera strobe to capture the flower still as it waved around with each small movement of air. Minor adjustments in Photoshop.

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Life

    A hike over the old lava flow… and soon to be new lava flow, but don’t tell the fern. A brilliant reminder that life will always find a way.

     

    This image was taken near the new lava flow at Kamokuna in the Volcano National Park… fairly close to the lava flow. I deviated from the gravel road a bit to find this fern growing through the crack in the lava. The vibrant green leaves contrasting against the deep tones of the lava is a great contrast to life growing out of a harsh environment. I was captivated by the way the lava crumbled under my feet and sounded like glass breaking as I ventured to this spot. The wind was blowing and waving the small leaves of the fern making it difficult to shoot. My patience was definitely tested as I waited to the breeze to die down long enough to still the shot. Much more that I wasn’t even to my final destination.  Watching this new life was a bit calming as I began to realize how crazy it is that this fern is growing nearly five miles away from any other plant. I thought to myself how strange and foreign this environment is that is being created by the Hawaiian volcano.

     

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Macro

    Photograph of the details of a vibrant purple flower

    I was surprised with some beautiful flowers from my wife, so of course I set up to photograph them. What I love about macro is the new world that is seen within such a close up view of the subject. I didn’t notice all the amazing yellows in the center of the flower without the help of the camera. Then I began noticing all the tiny water drops that speckled the flower.

    Enjoy!

    © Christopher Johnson

    Available backlit from Big Naked Wall. Check out the website and see the cool things they are doing for artwork with their interchangeable prints on backlit frames.

  • Leaf Detail

    Photograph of a backlit leaf that shows all the amazing interconnected lines that makes up the amazing detail of a leaf.

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    © Christopher Johnson

  • Red Carnation Flower

    A macro view of the beautiful delicate petals of a red carnation.

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    © Christopher Johnson

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  • Succulent

    Close up of a beautiful turquoise Chick and Hen

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    Macro shot of a succulent that I was inspired to photograph this morning while drinking coffee on my lanai.

    © Christopher Johnson

  • Monstera Leaf

    Monstera Leaf

    Macro of a Monstera Leaf with rain drops.
    © Christopher Johnson

  • Macro Expression

    [title color=”dark” size=”h3″] Artistic expression in a macro world. [/title]

     

    These flowers are small. They are probably no larger than a 1/4 inch at the largest flower. However, you would never think they were small when viewing these images. That is what makes macro photography so amazing. The ability to create a scene from something so incredibly small.

  • Broad Leaf Imprints

    [title color=”dark” size=”h3″] How amazing the intricacies of a simple leaf can be. [/title]

     

    When feeling dried up of all creativity, it is then that I find myself wandering around studying everything around me for something new. This study of the leaf began as I stood at the base of a large tree on the hunt for a chameleon. My eyes fixed on scanning the branches to find the camouflaged lizard was my only goal. As my gaze began to go higher up into the tree, it was then I began seeing the beauty of the large broad leaves as they were backlit by the sun.

    In photographing a single leaf I began wondering what other leaves might look like with the same effect. With that said, I began my search, away from the chameleon, toward the design of broad leaves through a macro lens.

    This is my small growing study of the inner workings of a leaf and amazing differences between species.

  • Pink Garden Flower

    Macro of a pink garden flower.

    by Christopher Johnson